Farmer in field

Economic growth and development are important to the prosperity of our Region.

A number of industry-specific economic profiles are outlined below. 

Industry profiles

We have produced six industry profiles including:

  • agriculture
  • health and wellbeing
  • food product manufacturing
  • advanced manufacturing
  • transport and logistics
  • international education.

These reports are intended to provide a summary of particular industries in our Region. The profiles present key economic, sectoral and other statistical indicators in a range of categories.

Disclaimer: All figures and data presented in these documents are based on data sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), other government agencies, .id Consulting and the National Institute of Economic & Industry Research (NIEIR). These documents are provided in good faith with every effort made to provide accurate data and apply comprehensive knowledge. No responsibility is accepted for inadvertent errors.

Prepared for Toowoomba Regional Council by .id Consulting. 

For further information, please refer to the Toowoomba Region’s online information tools.

Globally competitive industryadvancedmanufacturingstatisticgraphic

The advanced manufacturing industry is increasingly becoming integral to the Toowoomba Region’s economy. The industry spans a variety of sectors in the Region, including:

  • agriculture
  • mining
  • transport equipment manufacturing.

Over the last decade, it has developed into a competitive and specialised industry supplying high value adding products to domestic and international markets.

In 2019/20, the advanced manufacturing industry generated $135 million in value added and supported 1,204 jobs. The industry is continuously becoming more productive, growing 40% over the last decade which has had a major impact on the industry’s competitiveness in the export market. In 2019/20, the industry exported $157 million, where 59% of the exports were to international markets.

The advanced manufacturing industry was impacted by the outbreak of COVID-19, decreasing the value added by 19% and employment by 12% between the March and June quarters of 2020. Looking forward, the rebound in agricultural production and its increase in demand for specialised advanced machinery will help the industry recover.

Major international exporter

The advanced manufacturing industry in Toowoomba is increasingly tapping into the market beyond the Region. Over the last decade, the industry export increased to $157 million in 2019/20, a growth of 72%. The industry has a strong connection to the international market, where the industry exported $92 million to the international market, or 16% of the Toowoomba Region's total international exports in 2019/20.

Increasing international demand and continuous growth in the Region’s specialised advanced manufacturing sectors, such as composite materials and agricultural machinery, will provide substantial growth into the future.

 

Exporting to domestic and global market

% of advanced manufacturing industry output by destination, 2019/20

Exporting to domestic and global market pie chart

Source: National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR), 2021. Compiled and presented by .id the population experts.

 

Growing innovation and productivity

In addition to the traditional product manufacturing technology, the advanced manufacturing industry utilises a number of digital technologies known as Industry 4.0.

Industry 4.0 includes the specialised knowledge, technology or processes required for production, such as:

  • additive manufacturing (3D printing)
  • robotics and automation
  • advanced materials
  • artificial intelligence and machine learning
  • nanotechnologies
  • biotechnologies.

Manufacturers increasingly fall into the advanced manufacturing category based on the growing skills of their workforce, technological investment and a commitment to research and development.

Businesses in the Toowoomba Region are increasingly adopting new manufacturing technologies and investing in research and development. This is highlighted by a strong increase in productivity over the last decade, boosting the industry’s competitiveness in the export market. In 2019/20, the advanced manufacturing industry productivity was $111,790 per worker, an increase of 40% compared to 2009/10.

Increase in skilled workers

The industry’s high productivity is also accompanied by an increase in skilled workers. In 2016, the majority (55%) of manufacturing workers in the Toowoomba Region had post-school qualifications, compared to 49% in 2011. This is particularly the case in transport equipment and machinery equipment manufacturing, where over two-thirds of the workers have post-school qualifications, and one in five have an advanced diploma or higher.

 

Manufacturers in the Toowoomba Region becoming more qualified

Share of workforce with post-school qualification, 2011 and 2016

Graph showing that manufacturers in the Region are becoming more qualified 2016 versus 2011

Source: ABS Census of Population and Housing, 2016, Place of Work data

 

Specialisations in agriculture, mining and transport related manufacturing

The Toowoomba Region has developed specialisations in advanced manufacturing industries that have a strong supply-chain relationship with the Region’s strategic industries. In 2016, the agricultural machinery and equipment manufacturing share of total jobs in Toowoomba was 8.1 times greater than Queensland; aircraft manufacturing and repair services sector were 2.2 times greater than the state; motor vehicle body and trailer manufacturing and mining and construction machinery manufacturing sectors had a share of workers, respectively, 2.1 and 1.7 times greater than Queensland.

 

Toowoomba has developed specialisations in key advanced manufacturing sectors

Share of total jobs times larger than Queensland, 2016

Graph showing the specialisations that Toowoomba has developed in key advanced manufacturing sectors and share of total jobs times larger than Queensland.

Source: ABS Census of Population and Housing, 2016, Place of Work data.

 

A world leader in composite materials

A number of businesses and research bodies in the Toowoomba Region are working to understand and commercialise the vast potential of advanced composite materials and technologies. This includes Buchanan Advanced Composites, Wagners Composite Fibre Technologies and LSM Advanced Composites.

The Centre for Future Materials (CFM) based at the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) conducts world leading research in advanced composite manufacturing, in partnership with industry.

CFM are collaborating on:

  • Pultrusion - holistic engineering optimising the existing composite pultrusion process for increased productivity and development of novel value-added products such as fire-retardant sleepers and civil structures to be used for the Inland Rail project.
  • Filament Winding – a collaboration with Gilmour Space Technologies and Teakle Composites to develop composite rocket fuel tanks for low-cost space transport. The project will demonstrate the critical technologies in manufacturing linerless, filament wound composite tanks for liquid oxygen. The consortium will manufacture cryogenic linerless composite fuel tanks up to two meters in diameter and trial them in rocket flights.
  • Resin Infusion - addressing the safety and technical risks applicable to infusion of hot exothermic resins, preventing thermal runaways that leads to charred resin, rejected parts, release of toxic fumes and risk of fire.
  • Smart Composites - developing new multifunctional pultruded composite structures using novel graphene nanofibrous sensors for smart health monitoring of infrastructures.
  • Green Concrete - developing a reactivity index to help understand the properties of fly ash and its effectiveness in producing a low greenhouse gas emission geopolymer concrete.

Expertise in Machinery Technology

Russell Mineral Equipment (RME) is a global leader in the design, manufacture and supply of mill relining automation systems and services, contributing to the safety and productivity of over 380 mine locations around the world.

RME operate in over 45 countries with international offices in the USA, Canada, Chile, Panama, Ghana and South Africa.

The Toowoomba Region is home to the National Centre for Engineering in Agriculture (NCEA), also based at USQ, where researchers are developing adaptive systems that sense, control and monitor farming inputs such as water, fertiliser and chemicals by using variable rate technology, drones and proximal sensors that function in real-time.

NCEA has an ongoing partnership with John Deere to explore methods to develop the next generation of agricultural technology – including machine automation and control, such as driverless tractors. This relationship will also foster training opportunities for researchers and offer postgraduates research opportunities to work with a world leader in machinery manufacturing.

Sources:

  • Department of Industry, Innovation and Science, Australian geography of innovation entrepreneurship
  • Department of Industry, Innovation and Science, SA3 Region Innovation Data 2009-16
  • University of Southern Queensland Research
  • Economic and employment data - National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) ©2021
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing 2016

transportandlogisticsstatisticgraph

Transport hub for South East Queensland

The Toowoomba Region is emerging as a major transport hub for South East Queensland by leveraging off the Region’s strategic location as the western gateway to the $237 billion South East Queensland economy; proximity to the Surat and Cooper Basins; and prime position on the Melbourne to Brisbane freight route.

In 2019/20, the transport and logistics industry employed over 3,300 people and generated $360 million in value added. The industry also supports the export of products to the domestic and international markets, where Toowoomba exported $7.6 billion in 2019/20.

COVID-19 had a significant impact on the transport and logistics industry. The industry value added and employment dropped, respectively, by 26% and 19% between the March and June quarters of 2020. However, international air freight increased significantly by 177% in 2020, driven by the increase in premium agricultural product export to the growing Asian market. Moreover, the pandemic has accelerated the increase in demand for online shopping, further increasing the demand for freight services. Toowoomba’s specialised transport and logistics industry is well placed to capture this opportunity by leveraging off the Region’s strategic location and infrastructure.

Diverse range of transport sectors

The road transport sector contributes the majority (54%) of the total transport and logistics industry value added, based on the strategic geographic location along the Melbourne-Brisbane freight route. Other modes of transport are increasingly become important, with the opening of Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport and the projected Inland Rail project. Looking forward, the completion of major infrastructure projects should support growth in the future.

 

Diverse range of transport

% of transport and logistic industry value added, 2019/20

Pie chat showing the diverse range of transport and the percentage of transport and logistic industry value added in 2019-2020

Source: National Institue of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) 2021. Compiled and presented by .id the population experts.

 

Support competitiveness in the export market

Exports to domestic and international markets are a strategic driver of economic growth in Toowoomba. In 2019/20, exports generated $7.6 billion to the economy, a growth of $2.9 billion compared to 2009/10. The efficient freight services provided by the transport and logistics industry enables and contributes to the Region’s competitiveness in exports. In particular, Toowoomba’s largest export sectors, mining, agriculture and manufacturing, rely on the distribution service provided by the transport and logistics industry to meet the growing demand from domestic and international markets.

Wellcamp Airport expanded its trade hub role

The $200 million-plus Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport (WTB) is jet-capable, available for regular passenger services, charter flights, fly-in-fly-out (FIFO) and international airfreight services and will further embed the Region’s higher order economic function as a major regional city.

The airport is already having a significant effect on the Region:

  • After commencing passenger flights in November 2014, the airport now offers more than 80 direct flights a week to destinations including Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Townsville and western Queensland.
  • Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport offers Queensland’s only dedicated 747-8F international freighter service. Since November 2016, Cathay Pacific has operated weekly air-cargo services to Hong Kong, a gateway to more than a billion consumers in China.
  • The airport has experienced strong growth in domestic passengers. Around 115,000 domestic passengers travelled through the airport in 2018/19 before COVID-19. Despite the travel restrictions, the number of passengers remained robust, with 81,000 passengers serviced by the airport in 2019/20.
  • International air freight has increased significantly during the 2020 calendar year with over 2,900 tonnes of freight moved through the airport. This increase is 1,854 tonnes, or 177%, more than 2019 despite the COVID-19 pandemic. In comparison, the total international air freight in Australia dropped by 19% in 2020 compared to 2019, where only Toowoomba Wellcamp and Sydney Airport experienced an increase in international air freight.

 

Increase in international air freight despite the impact of COVID-19

International air freight, tonnes, Wellcamp Airport, 2016 to 2020

Bar graph showing the increase in international air freight despite the impact of COVID-19 over the years 2016 to 2020.

Source: BITRE, 2021, Airport Traffic Data. Compiled and presented by .id (informed decisions).

 

The Queensland Government provided funding of approximately $9 million to contribute to the establishment of a Regional Trade Distribution Centre (RTDC) at Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport, which aims to boost rapid access to international markets for agricultural producers. The $18m RTDC cold storage facility was officially opened in July 2021. With a gross floor area of 4,000 square metres the facility will be used to consolidate and distribute premium export goods including beef, dairy products, fresh fruit and vegetables, pork and packaged nuts.

Toowoomba Bypass

The $1.6 billion Toowoomba Bypass is a major state/region/city-shaping project jointly funded by federal and state governments. The 41 km route opened to traffic on 8 September 2019 and is set to drive growth in the region’s transport and logistics capabilities linking Brisbane, the Darling Downs and Surat Basin on the road freight network, playing a key role in accelerating the growth of regional Australia.

Inland Rail project

The Australian Government has committed to building a once-in-a-generation piece of national infrastructure by constructing a 1,730 km rail freight connection between Melbourne and Brisbane via central-west NSW and Toowoomba.

The Inland Rail will be constructed over a 10-year period, with around 2,300 jobs expected to be created in the Darling Downs Region during local construction. The Australian Rail Track Corporation Ltd. (ARTC) has been tasked with progressing pre-construction activities for the Inland Rail programme.

The Inland Rail Intergovernmental Agreement was signed in December 2019 with the project expected to create approximately 2,000 local jobs. It is estimated the construction will contribute around $5 billion to the local economy with construction set to commence in 2022. Completion of the project will see freight delivered from Melbourne to Brisbane in less than 24 hours, saving around $80 per tonne in freight costs and significantly improving capacity and demand for distribution hubs to open up in regional cities like Toowoomba.

Toowoomba Trade Gateway

Construction of vital infrastructure for the Toowoomba Trade Gateway was completed in late 2019 with funding assistance from the Queensland Government. The $16.7 million upgrade supported around 50 jobs and solidified the Toowoomba Region as one of Queensland’s leading logistics and industrial hubs.

InterLinkSQ

InterLinkSQ is a 24-hectare intermodal freight terminal linking rail, road, air and sea, strategically located 13 km west of Toowoomba. The facility comprises a master planned premium transport, logistics, warehousing and industrial estate and will house 3 km of state-of-the art rail infrastructure utilising the current West Moreton rail line and capitalising on the proposed Inland Rail project.

The combined InterLink Terminal and Industrial Park will provide seamless integration between roadside and portside, and include extensive storage, maintenance and provisions facilities. Overall investment in the project is expected to near $1 billion by its completion in 2025, potentially creating more than 1,500 jobs.

Seaway Group have signed an agreement with InterlinkSQ to build and operate a $235 million intermodal terminal on the Toowoomba site, with construction due for completion in late 2021. Once the road and rail terminal is operational, Seaway will offer a daily freight shuttle service to the Port of Brisbane.

AATLIS

AATLIS is a world first, industry-led collaborative-solutions precinct designed to help navigate sustainable and profitable pathways being developed by the FKG Group. With a core focus on leading (5G) connectivity and data intelligence systems based around its Tier III Pulse Data Centre, AATLIS aims to create productivity gains in the agri-food value chain through digital technology adoption and circular economy collaboration.

A 42-hectare intensive horticulture project, to be built over four stages, featuring six glasshouses and eventually employing 500 people, has been approved by Council for inclusion in the precinct.

The precinct will be a multi-faceted, world-class technology, innovation and fresh food district which will incorporate an integrated agriculture community, transportation and freight access and low cost energy solutions.

Sources:

  • Toowoomba Enterprise Hub 
  • Economic and employment data - National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) ©2021
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing 2016
  • BITRE, 2021, Airport Traffic Data

Major economic generatoragricultureindustryprofilestatisticgraphic

The Toowoomba Region has a strong background in agriculture since the early days of settlement. Despite the economic growth and diversification into other industries over the years, the agriculture industry today remains a major generator of economic value and jobs in the Region.

In 2019/20, the agriculture industry contributed $490 million in Gross Regional Product and accounted for 6.2% of the total output in Toowoomba. The industry supported 4,710 jobs or 5.7% of total jobs in the Region in the same year, significantly higher than the state average of 3.1%. The industry’s importance goes beyond the agriculture sector, with significant supply-chain implications to the rest of the Toowoomba Region’s economy.

Strong recovery from drought

Over the period from 2018/19 and 2019/20, the agriculture industry had a significant fall in output as a result of prolonged drought. The gross value of Toowoomba Region’s summer crop production decreased by $275 million, or -64%, in 2019/20 compared to 2017/18. Cotton and grain sorghum was also hit hard.

However, the production is forecast to stage a strong recovery in 2021 with COVID-19 having a minimal impact on Toowoomba’s agricultural industry. While international export demand has been impacted, domestic demand for agricultural products has continued to remain high. The gross value of crop production is forecast at $352 million, an increase of around $200 million compared to 2020. The total gross value of agricultural production is forecast to be $995 million in 2021, only 3.2% lower than the previous peak of $1,027 million in 2018. Moreover, the recovery in agricultural production will also have flow-on benefits for other industries in Toowoomba and help the Region’s recovery from the impact of COVID-19.

 

Strong recovery in crop production since the drought

Gross value of agricultural commodities $M, Toowoomba, 2009/10 to 2020/21*

Graph showing the strong recovery in crop production since the drought from 2010 to 2021.

Source: Queensland Government, Data farm and AgTrends forecast data 2008-2021, Australia, 2021. Compiled and presented by .id (informed decisions).

*2020/21 values are forecast data

 

Producer of a wide range of products

The agriculture industry produces a wide range of commodities including eggs, beef, horticultural products, grain, dairy products and cotton. Its importance in the Queensland economy is highlighted by its large share of Queensland production across a number of commodities. In 2019/20, the industry accounted for 6.1% of the state’s total value added.

Some of the high-value commodities in 2019/20 are:

  • Eggs: $215 million – 82% of Queensland production

  • Cattle and calves: $153 million – 2.5% of Queensland production

  • Horticulture: $128 million – 2.7% of Queensland production

    • nurseries: $55 million – 6% of Queensland production
    • avocados: $20 million – 8% of Queensland production
    • cut flowers: $12 million – 9% of Queensland production
    • lettuce: $5.9 million – 24% of Queensland production
    • onions: $0.8 million – 5% of Queensland production
  • Poultry: $93 million – 16% of Queensland production

  • Milk: $45 million – 21% of Queensland production

  • Grain sorghum: $32 million – 32% of Queensland production

  • Maize: $27 million – 63% of Queensland production

  • Cotton: $23 million – 23% of Queensland production

Export driven industry

The agriculture industry has a strong connection to the markets outside the Region. In 2019/20, the industry exported $757 million, or 55% of the total industry output. The majority of the exports head to the domestic market, with over 93% of the total exports, or 51% of the total industry output is exported domestically in 2019/20.

TSBE Food Leaders Australia is driving economic diversity in the Region through the Southern Queensland Innovation in Export Hub (SQ Export Hub). The program is providing the local food and agribusiness sector with support to develop their capability and enter new global export markets.

Wealth of transport infrastructures

The agriculture industry’s access to the export markets is supported by Toowoomba’s extensive transport infrastructure. The Region has a wealth of road, rail and air transport infrastructure and is emerging as a major freight hub. Moreover, a strong pipeline of transport infrastructure investments will further strengthen the long term growth of the strategically important agriculture industry by providing greater access to the export market.

  • Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport – a jet-capable airport offering charter flights, fly-in-fly-out (FIFO) and regular passenger and air freight services, embedding the region’s higher-order economic status. The international freight service is opening up new export markets for the Region’s agricultural industry. The Queensland government has committed up to $10 million to help fund a Regional Trade Distribution Centre at Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport, which aims to boost rapid access to international markets for agricultural producers. The new facility will be used to consolidate and distribute premium export goods including beef, dairy products, fresh fruit and vegetables, pork and packaged nuts.
  • Interlink SQ – an intermodal terminal linking rail, road, air and sea in South East Queensland. The facility comprises a master-planned premium transport, logistics, warehousing and industrial estate and will ultimately offer a daily freight shuttle service to the Port of Brisbane.
  • AATLIS – an industry-led solutions precinct aimed at creating productivity gains in the agri-food value chain, through digital technology adoption and circular economy collaboration. AATLIS incorporates the Pulse Data Centre and has Council approval for a 42-hectare intensive horticulture project.
  • Toowoomba Bypass - this $1.6 billion project opened in 2019 and will enhance the supply chain for the Agriculture sector by improving the productivity and efficiency of the transport and logistics industry, better linking Brisbane, the Darling Downs and the Surat Basin on the road freight network.
  • Inland Rail project – will enable freight to be delivered from Melbourne to Brisbane in less than 24 hours and save around $80 per ton in freight costs between Toowoomba and Brisbane. This new/upgraded line will also provide improved access to Sydney and Melbourne. It will also increase the volume capacity of freight, with trains able to carry the equivalent of 108 B Doubles.

Providing supply chain benefits to the wider economy

The agriculture industry has significant supply-chain implications to the rest of the Toowoomba Region’s economy.  The industry provides clean, green and safe agricultural raw materials as an input to the food processing industry, heavily influencing the growth in local agricultural machine manufacturing and drive demand for freight and logistics industries. The agriculture industry has helped generate Toowoomba’s unique local economy that is diverse and competitive.

The agriculture supply chain is being enhanced by major investment in research and innovation. This includes:

  • TSBE Food Leaders Australia is helping food producers and food processors in the Toowoomba Region access international markets and grow their business capabilities. This hub brings together growers, manufacturers and researchers to create a more efficient industry and new, value-added products.
  • The University of Southern Queensland’s (USQ) Agricultural Science and Engineering Precinct was opened in 2019, co-funded by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC). The precinct will be utilised primarily for GRDC-supported, USQ-led research, conducted for the benefit of Australian grain growers.
  • The Rural Economies Centre of Excellence is an applied research consortium that is strengthening the economic resilience of Queensland’s rural communities. Led by USQ, founding partners include the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, the University of Queensland, Central Queensland University, and James Cook University.
  • The Rural Centre of Excellence, part of a multi-million-dollar campus redevelopment at TAFE Queensland’s Toowoomba campus, provides industry-led vocational, and non-accredited learning opportunities to all aspects of the region’s agricultural industries.
  • The Centre for Engineering in Agriculture at USQ was established in 1994 to specialise in developing solutions for a sustainable and efficient rural sector. The centre is focused on delivering applied, practical and profitable research solutions that strengthen agricultural productivity and address environmental management challenges in Australia and overseas.
  • USQ’s Centre for Applied Climate Sciences is a leader in the provision of climate science research and development from sub-seasonal to seasonal scales and in climate change research, relevant for industry and government, internationally and throughout Queensland and Australia.
  • The Centre for Sustainable Agricultural Systems at USQ conducts research and engagement that enhances the management of agricultural enterprises, maximising production and conservation outcomes.
  • USQ’s Centre for Crop Health delivers research ensuring healthy crops for improved food security and on-farm profitability. The centre leads focussed research into sustainable crop disease management in the summer cropping regions of northern Australia.
  • DIT Technologies is one local driver of agtech solutions, including water supplementation and remote monitoring technologies, partnering with local innovators to focus on the future export of farming technology solutions globally.

Sources:

Study Toowoomba 

Toowoomba is Australia’s second-largest inland city after the nation’s capital and has rich traditions in educational excellence. As one of Australia’s most liveable cities, Toowoomba is a wonderful place to enjoy a world-class, safe and inclusive educational experience.

The Toowoomba Region has bold ambitions to burgeon as an education and training hub and to welcome increasing numbers of international students to our outstanding schools and universities.

Home to more than 160,000 people, the Toowoomba Region provides the best of metropolitan and rural lifestyles. The city is renowned for its internationally accredited educational institutions and has developed major retail and hospitality attractions in recent years.

Toowoomba acts as a major agriculture and mining services hub for the surrounding region but also has a growing supply of professional services jobs in other industries. Health care and social assistance is the largest employer in the Toowoomba Region, which is a major health and wellbeing hub providing health services for around 300,000 people residing in the wider Region.

Only 90 minutes by car from Brisbane, Toowoomba is within a short drive of the greater South East Queensland region, home to over 3.5 million people. The city is also connected by air, via Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport, to the major capital cities of Sydney and Melbourne with international connections beyond.

The Toowoomba Region’s rich traditions and bold ambitions deliver a unique charm and distinctive energy and we invite domestic and international students to experience our warm hospitality.

Key stats for the Toowoomba Region

Labour Market Advantage

In 2018, the Toowoomba Region generated more than 85,000 jobs. In 2018, there was an estimated $14.4 billion pipeline of infrastructure developments supporting strong future demand for work. The buoyant local economy provides many opportunities for students and graduates.

  • There are more jobs than local resident workers meaning the city is an employment destination for surrounding areas.
  • The economy has been growing faster than the state average in recent years, with Gross Regional Product increasing by 3.6% per annum on average for the past 10 years.
  • The unemployment rate was 5% in June 2018 and has been below the Queensland average for the last five years. This reflects a healthy economy where the demand for labour is still strong.
  • In 2016, 31% of international students in Toowoomba were in employment, compared to 24% for Brisbane and 29% for the Gold Coast (ABS Census, 2016).
  • The share of the local Toowoomba Region workforce born overseas increased from 12% to 14% between 2011 and 2016.

 

Main employing sectors, 2018

Chart showing the main employing sectors in 2018. Highlights healthcare and social assistance as highest employing sector.

Source: NIEIR, 2018

Job growth last five years

Charts showing job growth over last five years, Toowoomba above Queensland average. Second chart shows the country of birth for overseas born workers in Toowoomba.

Source: NIEIR, 2018

 

Lifestyle advantage

Toowoomba is one of Australia’s most liveable cities with an abundance of green space, cultural services and recreational facilities, supported by an affordable housing market. Toowoomba is an internationally accredited safe community, making it a desirable destination for international students, migrants and tourists.

Highlights of living in the city include:

  • Grand Central Shopping Centre which offers over 50 fashion stores, including global high street brands like H&M, a 5-screen cinema, a 550-seat food court and 140 specialty stores.
  • Inner-city dining options, many located in laneways throughout the CBD.
  • The largest performing arts precinct in regional Australia, boasting several performance and function spaces and serving as an entertainment hub. The heritage-listed Empire Theatre is renowned for its classic art deco architecture and has played an integral role in the cultural development of our Region.
  • Major festivals including the famous 10-day Toowoomba Carnival of Flowers which attracts over 250,000 visitors across all events. The city also regularly hosts large sporting events including pre-season National Rugby League and Super Rugby matches.
  • Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport provides over 80 direct flights a week to interstate capitals and the option to directly link with overseas destinations.
  • The city is only 1.5 hours from Brisbane and 2 hours to the sandy beaches of the Gold Coast.
  • Toowoomba is located on the edge of the Great Dividing Range and is surrounded by a Region of beautiful rolling plains.
  • As Australia’s Garden City, Toowoomba is the perfect place to pack a picnic, relax and enjoy one of our 150-plus parks and gardens.

 

Employee incomes, 24 years and under, 2016

Graph showing employee incomes for people aged 24 years and under in 2016.

Source: ABS, 2018, Estimates of Personal Income for Small Areas, 2011-16

 

Whilst housing costs are well below larger areas in South East Queensland, income levels of young adults are in fact, actually above average. This creates a substantial affordability advantage for students and new workers.

  • The average young adult in the Toowoomba Region was earning $27,000 per annum in 2016, higher than those living in Brisbane or the Gold Coast. Those in professional occupations were earning $5,000 per annum more.
  • Higher income levels aside, housing costs are still extremely affordable. The cost of renting a three-bedroom home in Toowoomba was $200 per week cheaper in 2018 than on the Gold Coast, and $125 per week cheaper than in Brisbane.

Median weekly rent, 2018

Chart showing median weekly rent in 2018 

Source: REIQ, 2018, Queensland Market Monitor

 

Education advantage

Toowoomba is known for having some of the best educational facilities in Queensland.

  • Study Toowoomba is a Queensland Government initiative promoting and supporting educational excellence in the Toowoomba Region. This newly-established peak body represents education and training stakeholders dedicated to supporting students who choose to study in Toowoomba. Study Toowoomba will be instrumental in marketing the Toowoomba Region as the destination of choice for international students.
  • Toowoomba is the founding location of the University of Southern Queensland (USQ), with programs offered at its main campus, via online education and with national and international education partners. The university is a founding member of the Regional Universities Network and is internationally awarded for its world-class online learning platforms and research expertise in Agriculture and Environmental Sciences.
  • TAFE Queensland’s Toowoomba campus is a major asset for the Region with its courses tailored in consultation with employers in a range of sectors. International students can enhance English language skills, get trade qualified, or complete a professional-level qualification across a wide variety of industry areas. A new Rural Centre for Excellence will focus on educational opportunities and innovation in sustainable agriculture and horticulture practices. The campus incorporates real-world training facilities including Futures, a fully licensed training restaurant.
  • The Toowoomba Region is home to 90 highly-regarded government and independent schools which service the broader Darling Downs region for junior, middle and senior schooling. Eight of these schools offer outstanding boarding facilities to regional, interstate and overseas students. Many schools offer family homestay for international students or a combination of boarding and homestay options.
  • The following independent schools in Toowoomba are on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS):

Toowoomba Anglican School | Co-educational kindergarten – year 12 | Boarding facilities available years 1 -12

Concordia College | Co-educational prep – year 12 | Boarding facilities available years 7-12

Fairholme College | Girls kindergarten – year 12 | Boarding facilities available years 5-12

The Glennie School | Girls kindergarten – year 12 | Boarding facilities available years 6-12

Toowoomba Grammar School | Boys prep – year 12 | Boarding facilities available years 5-12

St Ursula's College | Girls years 7- 12 | Boarding facilities available years 7-12

Downlands College | Co-educational years 4 – 12 | Boarding facilities available years 4-12

Highlands Christian College | Co-educational prep – year 12

St Saviour's College | Girls years 7 – 12 |Boarding facilities available years 7-12

  • Several CRICOS registered government schools located in Toowoomba also actively host international students for study tours and long-term exchanges, including:

Centenary Heights State High School Co-educational years 7 – 12

Toowoomba State High School Co-educational years 7 – 12

Harristown State High School Co-educational years 7 – 12

Wilsonton State High School Co-educational years 7 – 12

  • Educational tourism provider, Camp Cooby, offers experiential learning experiences in outdoor education and leadership, social and emotional wellbeing, entrepreneurship and innovation, and environmental sustainability. Students of all ages engage in an active learning curriculum in combination with a unique Australian adventure camping experience. The team at Camp Cooby include qualified teachers, scientists, outdoor educators, psychologists, business innovators, and adventurous program staff.
  • The University of Queensland’s Rural Clinical School delivers a clinical training program to medical students through a mix of public, private and allied healthcare providers in a modern facility adjacent to the Toowoomba Hospital. The school includes a clinical skills laboratory, clinical simulation facilities and a medical library.
  • Queensland Rural Medical Education has partnered with Griffith University to promote and advance rural and remote health practise through training, research and collaboration with government and strategic health agencies. Qualified clinical educators deliver programs for high school students, medical students, practitioners, healthcare providers and research focusing on rural health.
  • Southern Queensland Rural Health (SQRH) is a University Department of Rural Health, a Commonwealth-funded collaboration between the University of Queensland, the University of Southern Queensland, Darling Downs Health and South West Hospital and Health Service. SQRH delivers effective rural training opportunities for nursing, midwifery and allied health students.
  • Qantas has chosen the Toowoomba Region as the home of its first Qantas Group Pilot Academy. Purpose-built training facilities and student accommodation, together with a world-class pilot school, will be open to students from Australia and around the globe in 2019.
  • The USQ School of Creative Arts supports performing and visual arts. The McGregor Retreats have a 50-year history of offering a range of artistic workshops covering everything from watercolour to woodwork.
  • The city extends a warm welcome to hundreds of international students each year with the COOEE International Student Welcome Event. The Australian-themed event includes an official welcome from the Toowoomba Region Mayor.

 

University of Southern Queensland (USQ)

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  • No. 1 University in Australia for starting graduate salary

  • No. 3 for graduates in full-time employment

  • 28,000 students from 110 countries

Source: USQ, 2018; Good Education Group, 2018

 

The University of Southern Queensland (USQ) is highly regarded for its student experience and research expertise in advanced engineering, environmental sciences and regional economics.

For international students, USQ offers:

  • Education partners in Malaysia, Mauritius, Pakistan, Russia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, and Vietnam
  • Dedicated student support
  • Scholarship opportunities
  • Study tour and English language programs
  • Accommodation within residential colleges and homestays
  • Free airport collection and transfer to accommodation for newly arrived students
  • International student career advice
  • Student welfare, health, counselling and wellbeing
  • Multi-faith support services
  • Regular student events and activities

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Related information

Industry Profile - Education and Training

Industry profile - Education (Chinese version)

University of Southern Queensland website

Toowoomba and Surat Basin Enterprise website

TAFE Queensland South West website

Developed specialisation in food manufacturingfoodproductmanufacturingstatisticgraphic

Access to products from Toowoomba and Queensland’s agricultural industry, superior logistical infrastructure and accessibility to major markets has established Toowoomba’s position as a major food processing hub and a supply chain contributor to domestic and international markets.

The food product manufacturing industry adds significant value to the agriculture industry by turning raw ingredients into a range of value added products. In turn, it helped to create a food manufacturing industry that is diverse, productive, and internationally competitive.

The food product manufacturing industry is the Toowoomba Region’s largest manufacturing industry. In 2019/20 the industry employed 2,402 workers and generated $250 million in value added, accounting for 40% of the total manufacturing industry. The industry valued added increased by $12 million or +6.5% over the last decade, despite the decrease in agricultural production from the recent drought. During the same period, the industry had strong growth in productivity through technological advances and innovations. In 2019/20, the industry productivity per worker was $104,000, an increase of $20,300 or +24% over the last decade.

 

Food processing is the Toowoomba Region's most important manufacturing sector

% of total manufacturing value add, 2019/20

Pie chart showing the % of total manufacturing value add by sector. Food product manufacturing being the largest sector at 40%.

Source: National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) 2021. Compiled and presented by .id the population experts.

 

Strong growth post COVID-19

The demand for food product manufacturing industry products has remained strong despite the economic effects of COVID-19. The industry employment and value added increased over 25% between the March and June Quarters in 2020. This growth is largely driven by increased demand for food products in both domestic and international markets.

 

Strong increase in food product manufacturing post COVID-19

Change in food product manufacturing industry jobs and value added, % change, June Qtr 2020

Graph showing strong increase in food product manufacturing post COVID-19.

Source: National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) 2021. Compiled and presented by .id (informed decisions).

 

The international demand for Toowoomba’s premium food products remained strong despite COVID-19.  In 2020, over 2,900 tonnes of international air freight were moved through the airport, where the majority of the freight was chilled meat and horticulture products destined to China and South East Asia. Toowoomba is well positioned to utilise the opportunity from growing Asian market demand for premium food products with the planned Regional Trade Distribution Centre (RTDC) at Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport, where the new facility will be used to consolidate and distribute Toowoomba’s premium agricultural products for export.

 

Increase in international air freight despite the impact of COVID-19

International air freight, tonnes, Wellcamp Airport, 2016 to 2020

Graph showing the increase in international air freight despite the impact of COVID-19 2016 to 2020.

Source: BITRE, 2021, Airport Traffic Data. Compiled and presented by .id (informed decisions).

 

Adding value beyond the farm-gate

The Toowoomba Region has unique local advantages establishing the Region as an ideal hub for food processing. As well as a highly-skilled labour force, affordable land and superior transport infrastructure, the industry has access to clean, green and safe agricultural products from Toowoomba and the wider Darling Downs Region.

In 2019/20, the Toowoomba Region was one of the biggest generators of agricultural value in Australia, contributing 6.1% of Queensland’s agriculture value added. The Region produces a wide range of agricultural products, including eggs, beef, cotton, cereal crops, poultry, milk, and pulses.

This direct access to food producers has enabled the food product manufacturing industry to gain competitiveness in the supply chain and develop specialisations. The food product manufacturing industry generated around 2.5% of the Region’s total value added in 2019/20, well above the state average of 1.4%.

Diverse range of products

Key food product manufacturing products in the Toowoomba Region include meat, bakery, dairy product, and grain mill and cereal product manufacturing, with a number of major players in the Region.

Oakey Beef Exports is one of Australia’s largest beef processing plants, packaging superior premium beef products for the world market. Approval for the abattoir to construct an automated cold storage facility and robotic palletising system for its beef products has recently been granted. The state-of-the-art cold storage facility will improve productivity and efficiency in supply chains. Oakey Beef Exports products are exported to international markets including Japan, USA, Republic of Korea, European Union, Canada, Taiwan and China.

Toowoomba Premium Milk (TPM) is a three-stage vertically integrated greenfield dairy project proposed to be built at Wellcamp Business Park. TPM aims to be Australia’s largest independent supplier and vertically integrated producer of selected milk products for export and has received development approval for the $75 million first stage of the project.

A Toowoomba Region pecan and macadamia processor has its products on the shelves of about 1800 stores in China. Stahmann Farm’s Riverside flavoured nuts have been exported on the Cathay Pacific freight service via Hong Kong since 2018.

Other major businesses in the Region include:

  • Quality Desserts - sweet baked goods
  • Mother Meg’s - high-end baked goods
  • Story Fresh - grower and preparation of fresh-cut vegetables
  • CF Oats - oat products
  • CJ Nutracon - beef stock.

Internationally focussed

The food product manufacturing industry in Toowoomba has a strong connection to the international market. The industry is the third largest international exporter in the region and exported $432 million in 2019/20. The industry remains highly competitive in the international market despite the increasing competition and anticipated reduction in demand from the economic impact of COVID-19.

TSBE Food Leaders Australia is driving growth in food manufacturing in the Region through the SQ Export Hub program. The program provides local food and agribusinesses with the support to develop their capability and enter new global export markets.

 

Strong connection to international market

% of food product manufacturing output by destination, 2019/20

Pie graph showing the strong connection to international market

Source: National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) 2021. Compiled and presented by .id the population experts.

 

Growing productivity through innovation and collaboration

The industry’s continued integration of new technologies and targeted export market campaigns will increase its ability to produce high-value food products and drive growth in productivity and competitiveness in the export market.

Initiatives that are supporting this include:

  • TSBE Food Leaders Australia (FLA), a collaboration between businesses (TSBE) and researchers (USQ), to support the growth and efficiencies of businesses working within the domestic food and agricultural market and to capitalise on opportunities in the global market. TSBE have entered into a partnership with TAFE Queensland to identify training and development needs and provide up-skilling opportunities in the Region through the Rural Centre of Excellence.
  • Southern Queensland Innovation in Export Hub (SQ Export Hub) is led by TSBE and designed to maximise the efficiency of the new air, road and rail infrastructure within the region, leveraging the export capabilities of small and medium businesses operating in certain sectors, including food and agribusiness.
  • Rural Centre of Excellence, TAFE Queensland’s new facility at its Toowoomba campus, will deliver high-quality training to ensure the rural industry’s workforce is equipped with a broad set of up-to-date skills. The courses on offer will include training in modern primary industry technologies.

Superior infrastructure

The Region’s food product manufacturing industry competitiveness in export markets are supported by access to superior transport infrastructures, which includes road, rail, air and port facilities. Toowoomba is strategically located around one and a half hours drive to the Port of Brisbane, giving access to domestic and international markets.

Major infrastructure investment in and around Toowoomba, including the Toowoomba Trade Gateway, will considerably improve the competitiveness of the Region’s food product manufacturing industry and export potential.

  • Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport, a $200 million-plus jet-capable airport available for regular passenger services, charter flights, fly-in-fly-out (FIFO) and airfreight services, will further embed the Region’s higher order economic function as a major regional city. As part of the Toowoomba Trade Gateway, the airport will open up new export markets for Toowoomba’s food product manufacturing industry. Since November 2016, Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport has operated weekly air-cargo services to Hong Kong. This is Southern Queensland’s only scheduled international air freight-only service.
  • Regional Trade Distribution Centre (RTDC), supported by the Queensland government and proposed to form an integral component of Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport. The centre will support rapid airfreight access for this Region's high-value agricultural producers to key international markets. The 3400sq m distribution centre would supply about 500 tonnes of fresh produce a week for freight aircraft, with construction to commence in the second quarter of 2020. The new facility will be used to consolidate and distribute premium export goods including beef, dairy products, fresh fruit and vegetables, pork and packaged nuts.
  • InterLinkSQ, a 200-hectare intermodal (road and rail) freight and logistics facility and part of the Toowoomba Trade Gateway. The facility will house 3km of state-of-the art rail infrastructure for the current West Moreton rail line and the proposed Inland Rail Project, providing extensive storage, maintenance and provisions facilities. Overall investment in the project is expected to near $1 billion by its full completion date in 2025. Seaway Group have signed an agreement with InterLinkSQ to build and operate a $235 million intermodal terminal on the site, with construction due for completion in late 2021. Once the road and rail terminal is operational, Seaway will offer a daily freight shuttle service to the Port of Brisbane.
  • Toowoomba Bypass, a $1.6 billion, major region/city-shaping project, set to drive growth in the Region’s transport and logistics capabilities linking Brisbane, the Darling Downs and the Surat Basin on the road freight network. This will support the cost competitiveness of Toowoomba’s Food Product Manufacturing industry.
  • Inland Rail project will see freight delivered from Melbourne to Brisbane in less than 24 hours, saving around $80 per ton in freight costs and significantly improving capacity and demand for distribution hubs to open up in regional cities like Toowoomba.
  • AATLIS is an advanced agrifood production and innovation precinct being developed by FK Gardner Group with a core focus on leading connectivity (including 5G) and data intelligence systems based around its Tier III regional Pulse Data Centre. AATLIS is located within close proximity to Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport and aims to create productivity gains in the agri-food value chain through digital technology adoption and circular economy collaboration.

Sources:

  • Economic and employment data - National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) ©2021
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing 2016

World-class health and wellbeing service provider for the Darling Downs

The Toowoomba Region health care and social assistance industry plays a crucial role in supporting the residents' health and well-being in the Region and the wider Darling Downs Region. The Toowoomba Region has developed and continues to develop health care facilities, expand its medical services, and provide a full spectrum of healthcare services.

The health care and social assistance industry in the Toowoomba Region is the largest employer and the second-largest contributor to Gross Regional Product. In 2019/20, the industry supported 14,360 jobs or 17.4% of all jobs, well above the Queensland average of 13.8%. In the same year, the industry generated $1,154 million in value added, accounting for 11.6% of the total Region.

The health care and social assistance industry is one of the fastest growing industry in the Toowoomba Region. With an increase of 4,853 jobs over the past decade, the industry was the largest job creator in Toowoomba. During the same period, the industry value added increased by $495 million, the second largest growth industry in the Region. The rate of growth continues to outperform the state.

 

Growing specialisation in health care

Change in jobs and value added, health care and social assistance, %, 2010-2020

Chart showing the growing specialisation in health care chart

Source: National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) 2021. Compiled and presented by .id (informed decisions).

 

The health care and social assistance industry was not immune to the impact of COVID-19. Hospitals experienced a short-term increase in employment while other areas like allied health services and residential care services were impacted by social distancing requirements. The industry value added and employment dropped, respectively, by 9.5% and 5.3% between the March and June quarters of 2020. COVID-19 has also led to a shift in the way health services are provided with many providers offering telehealth services. Recovery in the health sector is already underway with demographic change continuing to drive opportunities in this sector.

healthandwellbeingstatisticgraphic

Industry snapshot

healthandwellbeingindustrysnapshotstatisticgraphic

Providing a full spectrum of services

The health care and social assistance industry provide a wide range of services. The largest sub-sector of the industry is medical and other health care services, employing 4,442 workers, followed by social assistance service with 4,188 workers. These sub-sectors experienced significant growth over the last decade, growing by 2,204 people and 1,924 people respectively. In 2020, the two sectors represented 60% of the total workers in the health care and social assistance industry.

 

Toowoomba Region's health care provider role supports large amount of jobs

Health care and social assistance employment, Toowoomba

Graph showing that Toowoomba Region's health care provider role supports a large amount of jobs.

Source: National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) 2021. Compiled and presented by .id the population experts.

 

Rich and diverse infrastructure

The health care and social assistance industry in Toowoomba offers a diverse range of world-class health care services for residents in the wider Region. The Toowoomba Region is home to eight hospitals, including three major facilities:

  • St Vincent’s Private Hospital Toowoomba
  • Toowoomba Hospital
  • St Andrew’s Toowoomba Hospital.

TSBE Health links businesses with opportunities in the growing health industry by boosting the Toowoomba Region’s health profile and promoting the liveability and services in the Region. TSBE Health delivered the inaugural Downs Health Conference in May 2020 and the group have also established the Workplace Wellness program, which will deliver economic benefits to the health sector as well as improved health to employees across the Region. In addition, TSBE Health are delivering Westfund’s Let’s Shape Up Darling Downs, a new initiative designed to promote wellness in the workplace and provide sustainable outcomes for businesses.

Toowoomba also hosts the Darling Downs and West Moreton Primary Health Network (PHN), further boosting its role as the health hub for the Region. PHN partners with community organisations, health care providers, hospital and health services, and state and federal governments to improve primary health care services in our communities.

Health education and training hub

The sector also supports the Region’s training and skills development needs. Other major health education facilities and infrastructure includes:

  • University of Queensland’s (UQ) Rural Clinical School. Program delivery and operations in Toowoomba are based at UQ’s Teaching and Learning Centre, adjacent to the Toowoomba Hospital. The centre includes a clinical skills laboratory and clinical simulation facilities.
  • Queensland Rural Medical Education (QRME) promotes and advances rural and remote health practice through training, research and collaboration with government and strategic health agencies.
  • Southern Queensland Rural Health (SQRH) is a University Department of Rural Health, a Commonwealth-funded collaboration between the University of Queensland (UQ), University of Southern Queensland (USQ), Darling Downs Health and South West Hospital and Health Service. SQRH has been funded to deliver effective rural training experiences for allied health, nursing and midwifery students.
  • General Practice Training Queensland (GPTQ) deliver the Australian Government funded Australian General Practice Training vocational training program for GP registrars to achieve recognition under the medical specialty of general practice. Toowoomba is the only one of three service centres in the South East Queensland Region, located outside of Brisbane.
  • Fairholme College has partnered with Mater Hospital, Brisbane to deliver Certificate III in Health Services Assistance to students through their new on-campus Health Hub.

Major investment

There has been substantial investment into the health and wellbeing industry, with over $87 million of health and aged care related building approvals in the 2019/20 year alone. All three major hospitals are investing in infrastructures and expanding their service offer.

Some of the recent health and wellbeing related investment includes:

  • Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service is planning the development of a new public health precinct to be built on the 74-hectare Baillie Henderson hospital site. The Masterplan and Feasibility Study have been lodged with the State Government in March 2021. The total project cost is estimated at between $1.8 billion.
  • St Vincent’s Private Hospital’s new emergency and radiology departments opened in November 2021. The $15 million facility also houses acute treatment, ambulatory care services and telehealth services, along with new medical imaging facilities.
  • A new $11.9 million upgrade to the health facility at the Oakey Army Aviation Base will provide primary care, mental health and rehabilitation, in-patient services, pharmacy, physiotherapy, dental and airfield emergency response services.
  • A new $8 million 29-bed mental health hospital operated by Mi-Mind Centre.
  • A development application to build a 2,500 square metre day hospital and a set of medical suites on Goggs St, Toowoomba City, has been approved by Council.

In addition, some of the recent health and wellbeing education-related investment includes:

  • TAFE Toowoomba has completed the second-stage refurbishment of their health centre and is training students in nursing, counselling, mental health, youth work and aged care support. The health centre is part of a $7 million campus upgrade.
  • A new $1.3 million clinical training facility was opened in late 2019 at Baillie Henderson Hospital and will be operated by Southern Queensland Rural Health.

Retirement hotspot

Over the last decade, the Toowoomba Region has established itself as a retirement hotspot. The Region provides retirees with an exceptional choice of facility type and world-class health care services. Australia’s ageing population combined with a strong migration into regional Queensland from New South Wales and Victoria post COVID-19 is expected to continue growth in the health and wellbeing industry.

The number of persons aged 65 and above in the Toowoomba Region is projected to increase by around 20,000 people between 2016 and 2041. The ageing population will increase the demand placed on health and wellbeing services and will provide opportunities for the Region to build on its already strong foundations as a major health hub.

 

Ageing of the population

Projected population change by age group, Toowoomba Region

Graph showing the ageing population

Source: Queensland Government population projections, 2018 edition. Compiled and presented by .id the population experts.

 

COVID-19 has elevated Toowoomba’s opportunity to attract older residents into the Region. The inter-state migration into regional Queensland increased significantly post COVID-19. During June to December quarters 2020, the net internal migration of the number of persons aged 65 and above was 2,000 people, or 30% more than during the same quarter in 2019 pre COVID-19. With a wealth of retirement facilities and a low cost of living, Toowoomba is well placed to leverage this opportunity and capture a share of older inter-state migrants into regional Queensland, subsequently increasing demand for health and wellbeing services.

 

Surge in retirees migration into regional Queensland post COVID-19

Quarterly regional internal migration, 65 years and over, rest of Queensland

Graph showing the surge in retirees migration into regional Queensland post COVID-19.

Source: ABS Regional internal migration estimates, 2021. Compiled and presented by .id (informed decisions).

 

The health and wellbeing industry in Toowoomba is continuously developing facilities with many completed recently, under construction and planning.

The recent residential care related investment includes:

  • Brodribb Home expansion, including 15 new rental units in September 2019.
  • Construction of a $67 million expansion of Carinity Brownsholme retirement village in Highfields is scheduled to finish in mid 2021. Upon completion, the village will feature an additional 96-suite aged care facility.
  • The Ninth Middle Ridge, a $30 million, 85-unit retirement village adjacent to the Toowoomba Golf Club is being developed by Aura Holdings. Construction of the ‘The Ninth’ Middle Ridge is due for completion by September 2021.
  • A new $12 million retirement village with 42 two and three-bedroom villas by the Oak Tree Group in Highfields.
  • Palm Lake Care opened the latest Aged Caring Community in 2020. Situated next to Toowoomba Palm Lake Resort, the facility features five small community wings and a specialised Memory Support Unit.

Sources:

  • Economic and employment data - National Institute of Economic and Industry Research (NIEIR) ©2021
  • Building approvals - ABS 8731.0 - Building Approvals, Australia, March 2021
  • Businesses – Australian Business Register – April 2021
  • Population projections - Queensland Government population projections, 2018 edition
  • 2020 TSBE Development Status Report – Toowoomba and Surat Basin Enterprise, Mar 2020