We have adopted our 2024-25 Budget, a $703.6 million financial plan that will allow us to maintain and upgrade existing facilities and services while planning for a brighter future for current and future residents.

We will spend $231 million in this Budget on capital projects, and $472 million on core operations.

On this page, you will find information regarding major projects, a breakdown of budget spend, information regarding residential general rates and residential water rates as well as other residential charges and levies. 

Quick links:

Major projects

 

Where the money comes from and where the money goes

Where the money comes from

  • Rates and charges - $328.85 million
  • Revenue and reserves - $165.59 million
  • Operating grants - Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements (DRFA) - $74.65 million
  • Capital income including grants - $51.80 million
  • Fees and charges - $50.27 million
  • Operating grants and contributions - other - $10.68 million
  • Loans - $10 million
  • Interest received - $8.73 million
  • Sale of assets - $4 million

Where the money goes

  • Water - $210.75 million
  • Roads, drainage, footpaths and bikeways - $133.22 million
  • Roads and drainage (DRFA) - $95.78 million
  • Business, strategy and operations - $70.52 million
  • Community services and facilities - $60.09 million
  • Parks and recreation - $49.74 million
  • Waste services - $37.14 million
  • Wastewater - $28.63 million
  • Planning and development - $17.75 million 

 

Residential general rates

The average residential property in Toowoomba City (City Urban Residential A) will increase in general rates by 5.01%. The average residential property increase across the whole Region for general rates is 5.75%. These are based on the average unimproved residential land value, however the impact on individual properties will vary depending on land valuation changes and general rate category changes.

Open a location below to view more detailed information:

Average land value in category*: $203,762.

The amount you paid in 2023/24 would have been:  $1,480.

The amount you'll pay in 2024/25 will be: $1,554.

This equals a dollar increase of: $74 and a percentage increase of: 5.01%.

* Land values are set by the Queensland State Government.

Average land value in category*: $598,866.

The amount you paid in 2023/24 would have been:  $3,696.

The amount you'll pay in 2024/25 will be: $3,871.

This equals a dollar increase of: $174 and a percentage increase of: 4.72%.

* Land values are set by the Queensland State Government.

Average land value in category*: $244,261.

The amount you paid in 2023/24 would have been: $1,383.

The amount you'll pay in 2024/25 will be: $1,467.

This equals a dollar increase of: $84 and a percentage increase of: 6.10%.

* Land values are set by the Queensland State Government.

Average land value in category*: $112,380.

The amount you paid in 2023/24 would have been: $1,058.

The amount you'll pay in 2024/25 will be: $1,164.

This equals a dollar increase of: $106 and a percentage increase of: 10.00%.

* Land values are set by the Queensland State Government.

Average land value in category*: $124,561.

The amount you paid in 2023/24 would have been: $935.

The amount you'll pay in 2024/25 will be: $1,028.

This equals a dollar increase of: $93 and a percentage increase of: 10.00%.

* Land values are set by the Queensland State Government.

 

Residential water rates

Water rates are in two categories - bulk water supply scheme and the non-bulk water supply scheme.

Open a location below to view more detailed information:

This scheme services the City of Toowoomba as well as the towns and localities of Birnam, Blue Mountain Heights, Cabarlah, Cawdor, Charlton, Cotswold Hills, Crows Nest, Geham, Glenvale, Goombungee, Gowrie Junction, Gowrie Mountain, Grapetree, Hampton, Highfields, Hodgson Vale, Jondaryan, Kingsthorpe, Kleinton, Lilyvale, Meringandan, Meringandan West, Merritts Creek, Mount Rascal, Oakey, Pechey, Preston, Spring Bluff, Top Camp, Torrington, Wellcamp, Westbrook, Woolmer and Wyreema.

 

The infrastructure charge you paid in 2023/24 would have been $631.

The infrastructure charge you'll pay in 2024/25 will be $672.

This equals a dollar increase of $41 and a percentage increase of 6.49%.

Costs and percentages include the on-time payment discount.

 

Based on a comparison water use figure of 182kL.

Your water consumption charge in 2023/24 would have been $506.

Your water consumption charge in 2024/25 will be $544.

This equals a dollar increase of $38 and a percentage increase of 7.52%.

This scheme includes services in Cambooya, Cecil Plains, Clifton, Greenmount, Haden, Kulpi, Millmerran, Nobby, Pittsworth, Vale View and Yarraman.

 

The infrastructure charge you paid in 2023/24 would have been $431.

The infrastructure charge you'll pay in 2024/25 will be $470.

This equals a dollar increase of $40 and a percentage increase of 9.27%.

Cost and percentages include the on-time payment discount.

 

Based on a comparison water use of 182kL.

Your water consumption charge in 2023/24 would have been $372.

Your water consumption charge in 2024/25 will be $411.

This equals a dollar increase of $39 and a percentage increase of 10.62%.

 

Other residential charges and levies

We have put a pause on the Park and Open Space Levy along with the Biosecurity and Bushland Conservation Levy.

For dwellings within a waste collection area, the waste collection service charge for a 240L general waste bin and a 240L recycling bin in 2023/24 was $293.

In 2024/25 it has changed to $307.

This equals a dollar increase of under $15 and a percentage increase of 5.00%.

For properties within a wastewater service area, the wastewater charge in 2023/24 was $502.

In 2024/25 this has changed to $532.

This equals a dollar increase of under $30 and a percentage increase of 5.95%.

 

For the small number of properties in Crows Nest and Cambooya on a Common Effluent Disposal system, your wastewater charge in 2023/24 was $251.

In 2024/25 this has changed to $266.

This equals a dollar increase of under $15 and a percentage increase of 5.95%.

 

Cost and percentages include the on-time payment discount.

This is a new levy in 2024/25. It has been introduced taking into consideration community feedback over many years. It will give us greater leverage in advocating to the State Government on improvements that are much needed to our Region’s public transport network.

This levy is set at $39.80.

This was previously known as the Environmental Levy. This levy funds planning, delivery and improvement of new and existing waste management facilities and the rehabilitation of closed landfill sites.

In 2023/24 the Environmental Levy was $73.

In 2024/25 the Waste Facilities and Landfill Rehabilitation Levy was set at $77.

This equals a dollar increase of under $4 and a percentage increase of 5.95%.

 

Mayoral budget speech

My fellow Councillors, staff, ladies and gentlemen, I am pleased to table Toowoomba Regional Council’s 2024-25 Budget and Operational Plan.

This $703.6 million financial plan will allow Council to maintain and upgrade existing facilities and services while planning for a brighter future for current and successive generations.

Today’s Budget draws on the combined talents of Council’s Financial Services team in collaboration with all operational areas across Council.

I thank my Council colleagues for their input in developing this Budget which will see Council continue to deliver essential services for our growing Region.

The Budget reflects the priorities outlined in the Operational Plan for the 2024-25 financial year, and Council’s Corporate Plan 2024-2029, which will come into effect on July 1.

We remain mindful of the cost-of-living pressures that continue to challenge families right across the Toowoomba Region.

That is why we’ve delivered a cautious and considered financial plan with a responsible rate rise.

The general rate will rise 5 per cent with the majority of urban residential ratepayers facing an average increase of $3.91 per week.  Keeping in mind changes will of course depend on individual circumstances.

We’ve reviewed and streamlined the levies we apply to each property, putting a pause on two levies, replacing them with a Public Transport Levy.

This new levy has been introduced taking into consideration community feedback over many years. This new levy will give Council greater leverage in advocating to the State Government on improvements that are much needed to our Region’s public transport network.

Our $703.6 million operational and capital works program once again delivers projects and services to support our growing communities across the Toowoomba Region.

Council will spend $231 million in this Budget on capital projects.

Projects like the Kearneys Spring Clubhouse and amenities building, continuing the roll-out of smart water meters, replacing timber bridges in key rural locations, upgrading formed and unformed lower order roads, renewing playground equipment in the parks of our regional towns and undertaking a business case exploring options for the future location and functionality of the Toowoomba Regional Art Gallery, are all included in this year’s budget.

We’re spending $472 million on our core Council operations to deliver essential services to our residents, ensuring waste is collected, parks and gardens are maintained, libraries and recreation facilities remain open and that clean and safe drinking water flows from the taps of homes right across the Region.

Council remains committed to implementing a responsible and calculated financial approach in its Budget planning and delivery and has budgeted for a surplus of $937,000 this coming financial year.

Council’s obligation to maintain our existing infrastructure and our ability to manage our $6.2 billion asset base across 13,000km² is a key performance indicator by which we are evaluated by the Queensland Treasury Corporation, which has recently affirmed our financial position as Sound with a Neutral outlook.

$98.2 million is set aside in this Budget for Capital Works Projects across the Region plus a further $22.5 million for the ongoing Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements (DFRA) Flood Recovery Program and $110.6 million for the Cressbrook Dam Safety Improvement Project.

Increases to the cost of living is having significant impacts on our operations with Council continuing to shoulder many cost increases on behalf of our ratepayers. 

A key example of this is that Council expects our insurance premiums to increase almost $900,000 in 2024-25, an increase of more than 30 per cent across some of our insurance products, an increase that is simply unavoidable but ultimately impacts our bottom line.

An extra $100,000 is also allocated this year for Council to deal with the continued rise in electricity costs.

Despite many external demands, Council continues to work in accordance with our long-term financial sustainability parameters to ensure we budget for essential capital works and services that support our communities for the coming year and into the future.

Council’s overall operational and capital expenditure parameters are based on our 10-year Long Term Financial Forecast (LTFF), which is not only adopted by Council, but overseen by the Department of Local Government, the Queensland Treasury Corporation and Queensland Audit Office.

In the coming year, the major areas of capital expenditure will include:

  • $33.5 million for water and wastewater projects (excluding Cressbrook Dam Safety Improvement project);
  • $22.7 million for roads, drainage, footpaths and bikeways;
  • $22.5 million to complete the 2022 DFRA Flood Recovery Program;
  • $10.3 million for parks and recreation projects;
  • $7.9 million for waste services;
  • $6.4 million for community services and facilities; and
  • $3.3 million for business strategy and operations.

We will continue to advocate for our fair share of funding to achieve our community goals and ambitions.

This includes continued advocacy to assist Council to deliver the Cressbrook Dam Safety Improvement Project. Council’s Business Case on the project will soon be before the State Government for their consideration.

More broadly, we need appropriate and equitable funding allocations from higher levels of government to support our efforts in delivering essential services to our community.

TRC continues to back the Australian Local Government Association’s campaign calling for a fixed 1% share of Commonwealth tax revenue for local government to aid long-term financial planning.

Restoring this non-competitive funding stream would improve Council’s targeted Budget planning and offer greater operational efficiency.

Local government cannot carry the full cost of providing essential infrastructure, in addition to meeting residents’ growing expectations across our other activities.

Communities are getting less than their fair share of funding and it is ratepayers who will be left to pick up the tab if this trend continues.

Local government needs far greater recognition of its primary role as a community builder to address the current situation. 

Figures published by the Australian Local Government Association reveal that local governments own and manage around one-third of Australia’s community infrastructure, a figure which is even higher across the Toowoomba Region with our extensive local road network and water assets.

Some of this infrastructure includes roads, footpaths, cycleways, parks and gardens, bridges, libraries, community and sporting centres/facilities, swimming pools, water and wastewater infrastructure as well as stormwater systems, all of which come with replacement costs totalling hundreds of billions of dollars nationally.

In our Region, Council is committed to working with our local suppliers. We proudly promote our Procurement Policy, which was enhanced at the start of the pandemic in 2020, and continues to pay dividends.

In the current financial year to May 2024, Council spent $198 million with local suppliers. This equates to hitting our 60 per cent target of our total expenditure year to date, with additional payments to be made in June.

In delivering today’s Budget, I particularly wish to acknowledge and thank:

  • All of my Councillor colleagues around the table;
  • Council’s CEO Mr Brian Pidgeon and his Executive Leadership Team;
  • This includes Ann-Marie Johnston, our Finance and Business Strategy General Manager;
  • Most importantly, I’d like to thank our staff in Financial Services, Customer, Communication and Engagement; Business, Transformation and Strategy and everyone involved in any way in the formulation and communication of today’s Budget adoption.

Your assistance is greatly appreciated.

We are confident that our cautious financial approach, and our planning for the future, means that our Region will continue to grow and prosper with our Rich Traditions and Bold Ambitions.

Thank you.

 

Special meeting live stream

Watch the Special meeting for the 24/25 budget.