Staff looking at plans in building frame

Groups include Office of the CEO, Environment and Community Services, Finance and Business Strategy, Infrastructure Services Group, Planning and Development Services and Water and Waste Services 

Council continued our mission to improve the liveability and attraction of our region by delivering valued and relevant local government services. Each year, we aim to improve service delivery by interacting with residents at a grass-roots level and encouraging residents to inform and guide our priorities.

We aim to plan for a sustainable and liveable future and this starts with our Executive Team setting aspirational targets for their respective groups.

In the following section, we outline our service groups as well as provide a high-level overview of how groups tracked against the actions set out in our Corporate Plan.

There are a number of external factors which may affect service areas and their ability to meet their Corporate Plan targets. This included changes in priorities after the start of the financial year, unplanned works and emergency events. 

Service indicators

Service indicators are based on the following:

 Greater than or equal to 85% is recognised as our service area being on track

 Greater than or equal to 50% but below 85% is recognised as our service area being in need of increased attention

 Below 50% is recognised as our service area underperforming

Local government has roles in governance, advocacy, service delivery, planning and community development, and regulation.

The Office of the CEO ensures decisions are open and transparent and made in the public interest. The team is also responsible for good governance of, and by, local government and for upholding ethical and legal behaviour of employees and elected members.

Democratic representation, social inclusion and meaningful community engagement are also key functions of the Office of the CEO, along with sustainable development, management of assets and infrastructure and delivery of services.


 

 

% of actions achieved

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

 Office of the CEO

 

87%

86%

73%

 Chief Executive Officer

 

72%

81%

NA

 Enterprise Project Management Office

 

35%

100%

NA

 Governance

 

95%

94%

73%

 Legal Services

 

95%

10%

75%


Branch performance commentary

Chief Executive Officer

The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is responsible for managing the organisational structure of council and ensuring council decisions are implemented. The CEO oversees the day to day management of council operations and is responsible for supporting the Mayor in the performance of his role.

This year the CEO prioritised building a positive culture and actively looked for creative and innovative solutions to improving service delivery outcomes for our community.

The CEO also influenced organisational performance related to workforce and safety matters and coordinated the the development, implementation and enforcement of policies and protocols to manage interactions between Councillors and Council staff.

End of financial year debrief sessions were held with all managers. During this time achievements, challenges and branch performance was discussed to maintain focus on continuous improvement.

Enterprise Project Management Office

The Enterprise Project Management Office (EPMO) operates at a strategic level to provide enterprise wide support on project portfolio management best practices, mentoring, tools and standardised processes.

This year, the EPMO concentrated its efforts on embedding the Project Management Framework (PMF) and its templates across Council. The EPMO conducted a sample PMF Gap Analysis with project delivery branches that identified an indicative 70-80% uptake.

Governance

Local government has an obligation to report, explain and be answerable for the consequences of decisions it has made on behalf of the community it represents.

This year the Governance Branch led and managed all legislative requirements in relation to engagement of Councillors and provided Councillor and Executive Support through the effective administration of Council business.

Key achievements:

  • 12 Ordinary, 66 Committee and 22 Special Meetings of Council and 248 information sessions were arranged within legislative and policy timeframes.
  • Oversaw statutory compliance, fraud and corruption prevention including 14 internal audits. Of these audits, 9 were completed, 3 were deferred to 2019-20 and 2 were in progress at the end of the financial year.
  • Provided leadership in the development of a risk management culture by updating branch risk registers across the organisation.

Legal Services

The Legal Services Branch is responsible for the provision of all legal services to Council through its own internal legal practice and external legal service providers.

Key achievements for the 2017-18 financial year include continued improvements in productivity and efficiency, with the team achieving 95% of activities planned against the Operational Plan.


The Toowoomba Region is famous for its stunning parks, gardens and the diversity of our communities. The Environment and Community Services group is responsible for a unique portfolio of services that enhance liveability.

 

 

% of actions achieved

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

 Environment and Community Services

99%

88%

87%

 General Manager Environment and Community Services

100%

94%

92%

 Community Development, Facilities and Tourism

100%

94%

92%

 Environmental Health Services

 

100%

96%

86%

 Library and Cultural Services

 

99%

78%

77%

 Parks and Recreation Services

98%

94%

95%

 Property Services

 

95%

74%

71%


Branch performance commentary

General Manager Environment and Community Services

Delivery of major projects across the region was a key focus for the General Manager Environment and Community Services including completion of Toowoomba’s City Hall Auditorium and Annex and progress on stage two of the Highfields Sport and Recreation Park.

The management team met regularly and achieved 100% of activities planned against the Operational Plan including the implementation of a Visible Leadership Program.

Community Development Facilities and Tourism

The Community Development Facilities and Tourism Branch provides information, guidance and oversight of a large number of functional areas including access and disability services, aquatic centres, cemeteries and multicultural services, developing tourism and the national award winning Toowoomba Carnival of Flowers (TCOF).

Highlights:

  • A record 255,639 people attended the internationally acclaimed Toowoomba Carnival of Flowers (TCOF) in 2017, with overall figures up 29% on the previous year.
  • The official opening and ongoing management of the City Hall Auditorium and Annex.
  • The Highfields and Oakey Cultural Centres remained popular venues for balls, weddings and conferences, with 626 events hosted in Highfields and 292 in Oakey.
  • 26,786 people attended 190 multicultural programs delivered or supported by Council.
  • 208 Council and community-led development programs were delivered including Seniors Expo, Toowoomba Languages and Cultural Festival and Linking Leaders program.
  • 391,992 people visited Council pools. More than 278,000 of these were at Milne Bay Aquatic Centre.
  • 357 internments at Council-operated cemeteries.

Environmental Health Services

The Branch protected the community’s health and wellbeing through the teams of Environmental Health Services, Compliance Matters, Local Law Enforcement, Animal Management Services and Parking Services.

Highlights:

  • Responded to more than 17,000 requests for environmental health service, including noise, health and parking complaints.
  • Responded to 1,613 requests to investigate, monitor and enforce animal management standards.
  • Responded to 43 environmental health complaints.
  • Issued 13,494 parking infringement notices.

Library and Cultural Services

Making an ongoing contribution to the Toowoomba Region’s cultural, social and artistic offerings, the Library and Cultural Services Branch provided numerous facilities for our residents including libraries, art galleries and community meeting spaces.

Highlights:

  • 527,132 people visited Toowoomba Regional Council libraries, with opening hours adjusted in Goombungee, Crows Nest, Oakey and Pittsworth to enhance service offerings for local residents.
  • Over 1 million items were loaned including 93,904 digital items and 995,334 physical items.
  • Over 47,000 hours of public internet were provided free.
  • The mobile library travelled 23,772km and hosted 17,457 visitors.
  • Libraries across the region hosted 1,409 programs and events including TooCon, First 5 Forever, holiday activities, author events, writing and computer literacy programs.

Parks and Recreation Services

The Parks and Recreation Services Branch continued to provide high-quality recreational facilities including parks, sporting fields and public areas this year.

Highlights:

  • Maintenance of 572 parks across the region including 1,054 hectares of actively managed parks and 5,573 hectares of natural areas.
  • 95% of the Branch’s capital works program was delivered including the progression of Highfields Sport and Recreation Park stage 2. Improvements relating to stage 4 works at Queens Park and completion of a new playground at Peacehaven Botanic Park Highfields.
  • Playgrounds and buildings were updated at Arthur Shooter Park (Oakey) and Yarraman. Trail development works were completed at Highfields, Mount Peel, Duggan Park and with the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail at Yarraman.
  • Ongoing consultation related to the development of the Picnic Point Master Plan.
  • 59,232 people attended a range of low-cost fitness and healthy living workshops as part of Council’s award-winning CHANGE project.
  • 3,521 trees were planted across the Toowoomba Region exceeding the original planting target of 2,000 trees.
  • 15 sport and recreation groups across the region shared $289,863 in grants to upgrade facilities and increase equitable participation in sport and recreation activities.
  • 16 recipients shared $41,413 in Environmental Grants including Friends of the Escarpment Parks, North East Downs Landcare and the Millmerran Landcare Group.

Property Services

The Property Services Branch achieved 95% of planned actions against the Operational Plan this year, managing Council’s building and property assets in an effective and efficient way.

Key achievements:

  • Toowoomba’s City Hall Auditorium and Annex officially opened in December 2017 following an extensive refurbishment.
  • Commenced construction works to revive the Railway Goods Shed.
  • Council approved a business case for a new library in Highfields including a customer service centre and community meeting facilities.
  • Planning on the new Principal Depot at Charlton.
  • 80% of Council’s CCTV cameras were upgraded from analogue to digital.
  • A significant number of land acquisitions to support future Council projects including the Central Highfields Master Plan and the Highfields Sport and Recreation Park.
  • Managing the impact of disasters within our community with the Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG) testing recovery planning and training.
  • 66,000 Emergency Action Guides distributed to properties across the region to help residents and businesses prepare for natural hazards and emergencies.

Council is committed to remaining financially sustainable and providing acceptable levels of service and infrastructure to the community now and into the future.

The Finance and Business Strategy Group is responsible for the corporate and business services functions of Council.

 

 

% of actions achieved

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

 Finance and Business Strategy

 

96%

96%

94%

 General Manager Finance and Business Strategy

 

98%

98%

81%

 Customer Service

 

100%

100%

91%

 Financial Services

 

100%

100%

97%

 Information Communication and Technology

 

93%

96%

87%

 People and Organisational Development

 

89%

93%

91%

 Service Improvement

 

93%

93%

100%

 Stakeholder Engagement and Communications

 

96%

96%

96% 


Branch performance commentary

General Manager Finance and Business Strategy

This year the General Manager Finance and Business Strategy identified opportunities to improve the organisation's culture and instil values and behaviours that encourage team work, innovation, openness, participation and quality relationships.

A realignment of content for the Executive Performance Report (EPR) was achieved early in the financial year to provide Council with a strategic focus, while outlining opportunities for managers to influence organisational performance.

Customer Service

The Customer Service Branch continued to exemplify Council’s Customer Experience principles maintaining above industry standard performance across a range of customer interaction metrics. In achieving this objective, the team used business analytics to inform and influence decision making regarding customer service key performance metrics and co-ordinate the efficient and effective allocation of resources.

This year Customer Service influenced a significant migration to digital channels, with more customers choosing to use online and self-serve options to interact with Council.

Highlights:

  • 92.19% customer satisfaction.
  • 141,802 phone calls received.
  • 56,242 face-to-face customer interactions.
  • 7% of customers transitioned from using traditional channels (phone and face to face) to digital channels (website, social media, phone apps and email).

Financial Services

The Financial Services branch achieved excellent financial outcomes for Council, achieving 100% of activities planned against the Operational Plan.

Key achievements:

  • The adoption of the 2018-19 Annual Budget. The $491 million financial plan included operational (service delivery) expenditure of $316 million and a capital (infrastructure) program of $175.1 million.
  • Asset Accounting:
    • The revaluation of Council’s largest asset class, the Road and Bridge network.
    • Capitalised $115.3 million. Our work in progress balance as at 30 June was $178.5 million.
  • Monthly Business Activity Statements and annual Payroll Tax and Fringe Benefits Tax returns lodged and paid within statutory deadlines.
  • 95% of supplier invoices (46,159) were paid within Council's agreed payment terms.
  • 97% of Council payments made via Electronic Funds Transfer.
  • 95% of supplier statements received successfully reconciled.
  • 31,290 customer requests were processed.
  • An overall rates arrears ratio as at 30 June 2018 was 4.21% (compared to target of <5%).
  • Half yearly issuing of rate notices and water rate notices completed on schedule.

Information and Communication Technology

Council continues to leverage information and technology to improve business functions and deliver benefits to the community.

The Branch worked hard with 96% of service requests completed on time. The team also supported 3 planning scheme amendments and were involved in the Record Management System Upgrade Project, including User Acceptance Testing and development of material and training for more than 1,000 staff.

Highlights:

  • 99.8% availability of combined ICT services.
  • 11,891 service requests and 8,023 faults logged.
  • 24,138 inbound mail items for the year.
  • 8,625 Dial Before You Dig (DBYD) responses.

People and Organisational Development

With a workforce of 1,765 people, Council is one of the largest employers in the Toowoomba Region, with 1,113 males and 634 females.

The People and Organisational Development team helped all Toowoomba Regional Council employees maximise their potential through a range of initiatives.

Key achievements:

  • 97% of office staff voted in favour of a new Enterprise Bargaining (EB) agreement, reflecting a positive relationship between Council and staff.
  • Large-scale Organisational Development programs delivered including Women in Leadership, Mental Health, First Aid, Generator Program and Unconscious Bias Training.
  • Enhanced maternity / paternity leave provisions.
  • Became one of only four Councils nationally to obtain accreditation with the Office of the Federal Safety Commissioner.
  • A new vendor-neutral temporary labour hire system.
  • The first Council in Australia to receive Dial Before you Dig accreditation.
  • Supervising 5 university graduates, 6 cadets, 8 interns, 4 scholarships, 32 apprentices and 46 trainees during the year.

Service Improvement

Delivering contemporary, innovative, responsive, high-quality and consistent service improvement that meets legislative requirements and community and organisational expectations was the key focus of the Service Improvement team this financial year.

Highlights:

  • Corporate Performance Management leadership and guidance including development of the 2018-19 Operational Plan.
  • The Corporate Performance Management Policy was developed and approved by Council.
  • Delivered TechnologyOne End User Experience initiatives across Council, including progress across Corporate Performance Management, Finance, Assets, Payroll, Customer Service and operational service delivery.
  • Delivered innovative mobile technology solutions enabling integration directly with two of Council’s core systems; TechnologyOne ERP and ESRI GIS system.
  • Deployed a foundation for managing properties leased by Council.
  • Coordination and development of revised Capital Project Prioritisation Model and foundation for Capital Business Cases.
  • Progressed and supported business areas with Asset Management Strategy and Plans.
  • Educated and supported Asset Management stakeholders on the pillars of Strategic Asset Management.
  • Initiated delivery of Asset Management modelling ensuring integrity of asset data, financial attributes and condition information.

Stakeholder Engagement and Communication

Every voice in our region is valuable and this year the Stakeholder and Engagement Communication Branch worked hard to facilitate meaningful two-way conversations with the community by encouraging engagement and consultation.

Corporate communication efforts focused on maintaining or increasing residents’ awareness that Council has a vision for the future of the region.

Council’s advertising spend for 2017-2018 has been in accordance with 2.55 Advertising Spending Policy.

Highlights:

  • Online visitor numbers grew, with an average 52,522 website users per month.
  • Six editions of BOLD magazine were produced and distributed to over 66,000 households.
  • Council’s YourSay website (yoursay.tr.qld.gov.au) continues to be a popular engagement channel for Council, with 16,600 visits this year and 5,250 documents consulted on.
  • Over 2.2 million views and interactions with our social media content.
  • The Media Relations team compiled 1,103 media releases, responses, speeches and news alerts.

Council’s Infrastructure Services Group (ISG) is responsible for providing a safe and functional transportation system along and maintaining key infrastructure services to ensure residents and businesses can thrive in the Toowoomba region.

ISG manages a sealed and unsealed road network of 6,578km as well as 152 major structures (bridges and major culverts), 2,081km of kerb and channel and 569km of footpaths and cycleways. The group also manages the Toowoomba Aerodrome and aircraft landing areas at Millmerran and Pittsworth and completes maintenance works on state-controlled roads on behalf of the Department of Transport and Main Roads (DTMR).

 

 

% of actions achieved

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

 Infrastructure Services Group

 

97%

97%

95%

 General Manager Infrastructure Services Group

 

100%

NA

100%

 Construction and Maintenance - Executive Manager

 

98%

100%

100%

 Construction and Maintenance Central

 

100%

97%

99%

 Construction and Maintenance North

 

100%

100%

100%

 Construction and Maintenance South

 

90%

96%

100%

 Plant and Fleet

 

98%

93%

90%

 Project Services

 

100%

96%

93%

 Transport and Drainage Planning

 

98%

95%

87% 


Branch performance commentary

General Manager Infrastructure Services Group

Delivering and maintaining major infrastructure projects across the region was the primary focus of the General Manager this year, with Council investing $143 million in local roads, footpaths, cycleways, drainage and aerodromes. Initiatives focused on reducing travel times, improving road safety and enhancing the reliability of our existing infrastructure assets.

The management team met fortnightly during the year and achieved 100% of activities planned against the Operational Plan.

Construction Maintenance

Construction and Maintenance (C&M) branches delivered exceptional levels of service this year, effectively managing an extensive works program for the region, with services predominantly undertaken by a day-labour workforce.

The Branch delivered a $73.9 million road renewals program to upgrade and maintain sealed and unsealed roads, along with the following significant road infrastructure projects:

  • Boundary Street, Cranley upgrade.
  • Mort Street, Toowoomba North upgrade.
  • Griffiths Street, Harlaxton upgrade.
  • Nass Road, Charlton.
  • Charlton Regional Detention Basin in the Toowoomba Enterprise Hub (Nass Road).
  • First stage of Wyreema-Cambooya Road rehabilitation.
  • Gap Road, Pittsworth.
  • The City Golf Club Cycleway, Toowoomba.
  • West Street and Drayton Road intersection, Harristown.
  • Wallace and Clairmont Street roundabout, Newtown.

Plant and Fleet

The Plant and Fleet Branch provides plant and fleet management, maintenance and metal fabrication services to Council, managing assets with a replacement value of approximately $95 million.

Proactive maintenance by the Branch resulted in a high level of availability of vehicles, plant and fleet being achieved this year, with maintenance completed in line with Queensland Treasury Corporation and Institute of Public Works Engineering Australasia (IPWEA) benchmarks.

Project Services

The Project Services Branch is responsible for managing the delivery of major infrastructure projects and for the administration of contracts for projects delivered by external providers. This includes the provision of project management and contract administration services in the delivery of new building facilities and park and recreation projects.

The Branch managed the Toowoomba Second Range Crossing interface with Nexus and the Department of Transport and Main Roads (DTMR). They returned works to Council and the continued construction of the Mort Street and Boundary Street link roads.

The Branch also provided project management services for the following projects:

  • Toowoomba’s City Hall Auditorium and Annex.
  • Construction works to revive the Railway Goods Shed.
  • Design for the new Charlton Principal Depot.
  • Planning and design for the Empire Theatre Refurbishment.
  • Design and construction for progressive staged upgrades at Queens Park.
  • Preliminary works to upgrade Cathro Park to create a link between the Railway Parklands.

Transport and Drainage Planning

The Transport and Drainage Planning Branch provides infrastructure planning, design and survey, asset management and operations services for Council's transport and drainage assets across the region. Aerodromes, road operations and transport planning are also managed by the Branch.

The Branch successfully retained Third Party certification to latest quality and environmental standards (ISO9001:2015 and ISO14001:2015) and developed Urban Stormwater Master Plans for priority catchments.

Highlights:

  • Completed surveys and designs for 30 projects totalling $9.97 million for the 2017-18 Capital Works Program.
  • Completed 5,181 customer service requests including 946 land access certificates, 1,093 heavy vehicle permits and 355 works on roads permits.
  • Toowoomba Aerodrome recorded 20,928 (take-offs and landings) aircraft movements.

Council is committed to building a vibrant and sustainable community where people can work, live and play. To achieve these broad outcomes the Planning and Development Services Group maintains and modifies policy settings that influence longer-term settlement patterns and the sustainable role-out of urban infrastructure required to ensure a healthy and vibrant community.

 

 

% of actions achieved

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

 Planning and Development Services

 

99%

96%

97%

 General Manager Planning and Development

 

100%

98%

100%

 Development Engineering and Plumbing Services

 

98%

98%

100%

 Development Services

 

97%

98%

100%

 Regional Architecture and Heritage

 

100%

100%

NA

 Strategic Planning and Economic Development

 

100%

93%

96%


Branch performance commentary

General Manager Planning and Development

The General Manager Planning and Development focused on aligning plans and policies with new State planning legislation this year, following the implementation of the new Planning Act 2016. The Act introduced a number of changes to development application assessments and plan sealing processes, including reductions to assessment timeframes. Ongoing Land Use Investigations also continued under the Imagine Tomorrow banner as well as free architecture and heritage advice services were offered across the region.

The management team met regularly during the year and achieved 100% of activities planned against the Operational Plan.

Development Engineering and Plumbing Services

The Development Engineering and Plumbing Services Branch provide an ongoing service delivery function to the development and building industry. The role of the Branch is primarily as a regulator ensuring an appropriate standard of built infrastructure and financial contributions toward infrastructure networks.

The Branch receipted almost $16.5 million in infrastructure charges and completed the following key measurables:

  • 2,028 operational development approvals.
  • 9,046 referral inspections and customer requests.

Development Services

The Development Services Branch is responsible for the assessment and determination of development applications and requests throughout the region pursuant to the Planning Act 2016. The Branch performs a key customer service role in providing information and advice to the community and to the development industry on development matters. The Branch is also responsible for the protection of the region’s amenity and safety in respect to building and development compliance.

The Branch assessed 502 development applications and requests. The Branch also conducted 163 pre-lodgement meetings and 1,007 development compliance inspections. 60,088 enquiries, including phone, counter, applications and customer service requests were handled by our Technical Advice Officers.

Regional Architecture and Heritage

The Regional Architecture and Heritage Branch delivered exceptional levels of service to internal and external stakeholders this year, responding to higher-than-expected architectural, urban design and landscape referrals. Heritage and character referrals were less than expected, however customer contact and advice activity was over double that expected with 735 on-site customer contacts.

Key outcomes:

  • Certification of 529 building applications and undertaking of 1,115 building inspections.
  • Assessed and provided expert advice on 336 architecture and urban design referrals that included 989 customer contacts.
  • Completed and provided expert advice on 558 landscape compliance referrals.
  • Assessed and provided expert advice on 228 Heritage/Character referrals.

Strategic Planning and Economic Development

The Strategic Planning and Economic Development Branch is responsible for the development of plans, policies and strategies to guide the future development of our Region. These future-shaping activities include ongoing maintenance of the Toowoomba Regional Planning Scheme, the Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP), the Toowoomba City Centre Master Plan, urban design and placemaking, environmental policy, economic development, international secretariat and commercial development attraction and investment.

Key projects:

  • Central Highfields Master Plan.
  • Concept Design for the Railway Parklands Priority Development Area.
  • 2018 Toowoomba Region Economic Development Strategy.
  • Inaugural Mayor’s Telstra Technology Awards held in partnership with Telstra, USQ and TAFE.
  • Supported formation of Study Toowoomba to attract international students to the region.
  • Sister City relationships continued with Takatsuki (Japan), Whanganui (New Zealand) and Paju (South Korea). Initial discussions also commenced for a new partnership in the Yuecheng District in China.
  • Completed phase 2 of the Green Infrastructure Strategy.
  • $37,000 was provided to promote economic growth in regional centres through Community Economic Development Grants.
  • Review of the Clifton, Crows Nest, Oakey and Pittsworth Community Growth Action Plans.
  • On Bells place making activation activities and the Russell Street Refresh in the Toowoomba CBD.

The Water and Waste Services group provides safe water supply and efficient sewerage services to connected customers in the Toowoomba Region. The group is also responsible for the collection, recycling and disposal of waste and manages more than 3,000km of pipeline including 1,309km of wastewater pipelines and 1,780km of water pipeline.

The group is committed to providing key services to residents and investing in water, wastewater and waste management infrastructure to meet the needs of our growing region.

 

 

% of actions achieved

2017-18

2016-17

2015-16

 Water and Waste Services

 

92%

77%

82%

 General Manager Water and Waste Services

 

37%

NA

NA

 Waste Services

 

88%

51%

52%

 Water Infrastructure Services

 

99%

95%

89%

 Water Operations

 

100%

97%

89%

 Water Project Services

 

80%

75%

79% 


Branch performance commentary

General Manager Water and Waste Services

Water security, water quality, dam wall safety and planning for a sustainable future were the key priorities for the General Manager Water and Waste Services this year. Audits and reporting were completed in accordance with appropriate standards and structures put in place early in the year to allow for the development of management systems.

Recalibration of priorities to focus on areas of greatest future risk resulted in a mismatch in corporate reporting. This approach did not affect the delivery of critical services to residents across the region, as detailed below.

Waste Services

The collection and disposal of domestic and commercial waste was performed to a high standard this year, with the Waste Services Branch achieving 88% of planned actions against the Operational Plan.

New waste management facilities were constructed and opened to the public at Cecil Plains, Cooyar and Evergreen, with upgraded facilities providing greater opportunity for recycling and reuse.

Council is also planning for the re-introduction of the Queensland Government’s waste disposal levy in early 2019 and called for expressions of interest to develop the landfill gas resource at the Toowoomba Waste Management Facility (Bedford Street).

Highlights:

  • 64,082 wheelie bin collections per week.
  • 155,378 tonnes of waste disposed to landfill.
  • 10,782 tonnes of waste recycled through kerbside collection service.
  • 7,524 tonnes of greenwaste diverted through kerbside collection.

 

Water Infrastructure Services

Water Infrastructure Services is responsible for the maintenance of Council’s water, wastewater, trunk and reticulation networks, dams, dam safety, fixed plant and equipment and associated control systems for water and sewerage infrastructure.

This year the Branch provided an excellent level of service delivering 99% of planned actions against the Operational Plan.

Highlights:

  • Conducted a trial virtual power plant trial with Yurika Energy (Energy Queensland) to help reduce the demand of electricity and save ratepayers money.
  • Exceeded targets for scheduled water maintenance activities at pumping stations across the region.
  • Development and approval of Emergency Action Plans for Cressbrook, Perseverance and Cooby Dams.

Water Operations

A safe sustainable water supply is vital for our health and one of the most important issues facing the region. This year the Water Operations Branch exceeded planned activities relating to the provision of a safe and secure water supply, and treatment of wastewater to environmentally safe standards.

Council successfully delivered safe drinking water in accordance with the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines and Drinking Water Quality Management Plans and has maintained third party certifications.

Key results:

  • 14,214 ML of treated drinking water to 62,463 connected properties (residential, commercial and Council).
  • Collected and treated 7,671 ML of wastewater.
  • Supplied 1,743 ML of manufactured water for use in industry, golf course irrigation and onsite usage at TRC treatment plants.

Water Project Services

Key projects were delivered to extend the region’s water and sewer networks in 2017-18, with significant money invested to meet future population growth and maintain existing infrastructure.

Highlights:

  • 88% of the water capital works program was delivered including substantial progress towards completion of construction and commissioning of trunk water mains on Hursley Road / Toowoomba-Cecil Plains Road and Nass and Wirth Roads.
  • Tenders were invited for the 8.2ML Wellcamp Water Reservoir Project, with access constructed to the reservoir site. The trunk water mains and reservoir will provide a secure water supply to the Toowoomba Enterprise Hub.
  • A $2.8 million project to connect Hodgson Vale to the Toowoomba water supply gained traction, with tenders for project work invited in June 2018.
  • Planning, investigations and procurement tasks progressed to upgrade the Perseverance Pump Station to address pump failure and condition issues.
  • A $20 million project to provide reticulated wastewater collection from residents in Kingsthorpe and Gowrie Junction neared completion, along with replacement of a 850m section of a Gowrie Creek trunk sewer.
  • A contract for the sewer relining program was delayed, with work commencing towards the end of the financial year.
  • Work commenced to bring the Wivenhoe - Cressbrook Pipeline system into full operational status including repairs and protection works to the jetty structure that supports the dam pumps. Preparation work will continue into 2018-19.
  • Contracts were awarded and design/construction commenced on a sewerage infrastructure projects including the Wirraglen, Highfields ($4.2 million) and Lorrimer Street, Oakey ($1.6 million) sewage pump stations; and Kara View Estate sewerage system upgrade ($0.9 million).
  • Progression of the Gap Road sewerage project ($3.3 million) to enable the expansion of the Pittsworth Industrial Precinct.
  • A contract was awarded to replace a 780m section of the Perseverance raw water main at Geham ($1 million). Design and procurement tasks were undertaken, with work scheduled for early in the 2018-19 financial year.
  • Various water main replacements and upgrades were undertaken across the region (over $2.5 million).
  • A new water supply bore was installed and commissioned in Greenmount.